What predicts which women will develop PTSD after a potentially traumatic event?

Number of baseline PTSD reexperiencing symptoms, rape history, and history of childhood physical assault were all found to predict PTSD chronicity 2 years later.

Chronic cases were also more likely to experience subsequent exposure to potentially traumatic stressors not involving interpersonal violence.

Contrary to our prediction, binge drinking and poorer perceived health did not predict chronicity.

An analysis of mental health treatment seeking revealed no relationship between remission status and treatment seeking at baseline or any of the follow-up assessments, even when controlling for baseline PTSD symptom severity.

The absence of a relationship between subsequent treatment seeking and remission status suggests that, for many women, symptoms subsided without professional assistance.”

[Comment: That is, I would say, 1/2 got better using their own network and resources, not those of a professional; this probably does not mean that PTSD just evaporates.]

Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy has scheduled an article for publication in a future issue: “Factors Associated With Chronicity in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Prospective Analysis of a National Sample of Women.” The authors are Jesse R. Cougle, Heidi Resnick, and Dean G. Kilpatrick.

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