The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are considered the first-line pharmacological treatment for PTSD. However, even when treated with this class of drugs, response rates rarely exceed 60% and less than 20-30% of the patients achieve full remission. The non-antidepressant agent with the strongest scientific evidence supporting its use in PTSD is risperidone, which can be envisaged as an effective add-on therapy when patients did not fully benefit from previous treatment with SSRIs. Prazosin, an adrenergic-inhibiting agent, is a promising alternative for cases of PTSD where nightmares and insomnia are prominent symptoms. So far, there is no consistent empirical support for using benzodiazepines in the prevention or in the treatment of PTSD

From the abstract for: Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry* (Volume 33, Issue 2, Pages 169-180) includes an article: “Pharmacologic alternatives to antidepressants in posttraumatic stress disorder: A systematic review.”

By William Bergera, Mauro V. Mendlowicza, Carla Marques-Portellaa, Gustavo Kinrysc, Leonardo F. Fontenellea, Charles R. Marmard, & Ivan Figueiraa,.

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